Sprouting Guide: How to Sprout Seeds and Bean Sprouts

Learn one of the most useful and versatile kitchen tricks: how to grow your own sprouts. Dishes that include fresh sprouts tend to be more multidimensional, super nutritious, and definitely more fun!

Sprouting Guide Video


(If you’re reading via email or feedreader, click here to view the embedded video.)

Why You Should Learn to Sprout

  • You can grow sprouts yourself in the winter to get tons of nutrition without spending tons on produce.
  • Keeping dry seeds and beans for sprouting is a great way to be prepared for natural catastrophes that might leave you without food. All you need is some water to sprout.
  • It’s very satisfying to watch seedlings and beans awaken and sprout in front of your eyes. It reminds us of the magick of nature.
  • You can eat a variety of different beans and sprouts that you might not be able to buy in stores if you sprout them yourself.
  • Sprouts make a great addition to so many meals and they add a great texture to salads too.

How Sprouting Boosts Nutrition

sprouting-your-own-sprouts
Photo credit: Sriram Bala

Sprouts are much more nutritious than the dormant seed or bean from which they spring from. By “awakening” these seeds, we are actually eating all of the live potential energy of the sprout.

Because of the higher water content in sprouts as opposed to dry seeds and beans, we find a higher nutritional content. Sprouts contain absorbable protein, and contain increased calcium, potassium, sodium, iron, as well as vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, and C.

Growing Your own Sprouts is Cheap & Easy

Another benefit to growing your own sprouts is the cost efficiency. Seeds and beans are inexpensive, and can yield an almost unproportional amount of sprouts.

You can also buy sprouting seeds and store them for long periods of time without spoilage. Contrast that with a bunch of lettuce that does not last more than one week in the refrigerator.

Sprouts are one of the most economical foods and some have called them the foods of the future. Sprouting your own seeds and beans is so simple, and yields such savings and benefits that I cannot recommend it enough.

Do it Yourself – How to Sprout

  1. Soak seeds overnight in a bowl with water.
  2. The next morning, drain water and rinse with fresh water once or twice.
  3. Place in a sprouting bag, or sprouting jar without any water. (Should still be humid, not completely dry.)
  4. Every morning and night rinse with fresh water, to keep the sprouts wet and clean of mould.
  5. Ensure the sprouts never dry up, and repeat process until your desired length or age of sprout.
  6. Rinse out with fresh water and serve immediately in salads, wraps, smoothies, juices, breads/crackers, or just eat as a snack.

Sprouting Tools and Resources


I personally use a nut-milk bag, which resembles cheesecloth, for my sprouting needs. (As you might have seen in the video.) It’s inexpensive, and versatile because you can also use it to make nut milks too.

I’ve tried sprouting in jars, (though not with the Tribest Automatic Sprouter) and I prefer the flexibility and ease that a sprouting bag seems to provide.

Feel free to experiment with what works best for you, depending on the climate where you live.

One great source of sprouting information that has been around since 1993 is Sprout People. You can buy sprouts and sprouting kits from them as well.

What Are Your Favorite Sprouts?

Now I’m curious if you’ve ever grown your own sprouts and which ones are your favorites. I’m partial to mung bean sprouts, and buckwheat sprouts personally.

Love, Nathalie